Shits & Gigs

The biggest obstacle to creativity is attachment to outcome. As soon as you become attached to a specific outcome, you feel compelled to control and manipulate what you’re doing. And in the process you shut yourself off to other possibilities.

I got a call from someone who wanted me to lead a workshop on creativity. He needed to tell his management exactly what tools people would come away with. I told him I didn’t know. I couldn’t give him a promise, because then I’d become attached to an outcome — which would defeat the purpose of any creative workshop.’

It’s hard for corporations to understand that creativity is not just about succeeding. It’s about experimenting and discovering.
[Language] came from our desire to transcend our isolation and have some sort of connection with one another. And it had to be easy when it was just simple survival. Like you know, "water." We came up with a sound for that. Or "saber tooth tiger right behind you." We came up with a sound for that. But when it gets really interesting I think is when we use that same system of symbols to communicate all the abstract and intangible things that we’re experiencing. What is like… frustration? Or what is anger or love? When I say love, the sound comes out of my mouth and it hits the other person’s ear, travels through this byzantine conduit in their brain through their memories of love or lack of love, and they register what I’m saying and they say yes, they understand. But how do I know they understand? Because words are inert. They’re just symbols. They’re dead, you know? And so much of our experience is intangible. So much of what we perceive cannot be expressed. It’s unspeakable. And yet you know, when we communicate with one another and we feel that we have connected and we think that we’re understood I think we have a feeling of almost spiritual communion. And that feeling might be transient, but I think it’s what we live for.

Waking Life (2001) - Richard Linklater

One of the single most thought-provoking, profound movies ever made.  

This is love. Missing her because she’s gone - wanting to die. You’re so lucky. You’re like a walking poem. Would you rather be some kind of fantasy? Some kind of Disney ride? Is that what you want? Don’t you see? This is the good part. This is what you’ve been digging for all this time. Now you finally have it in your hand - this sweet nugget of love. Sweet, sad love. And you want to throw it away? You’ve got it all wrong. The bad part is when you forget her. The bad part is coming so enjoy the heartbreak while you still can, for God sakes.

Louie: Season 4, Episode 10

If you’re not watching this show, you’re doing something wrong. 

There is more information available at our fingertips during a walk in the woods than in any computer system, yet people find a walk among trees relaxing and computers frustrating. Machines that fit the human environment, instead of forcing humans to enter theirs, will make using a computer as refreshing as taking a walk in the woods.

Mark Weiser, ‘The Computer for the 21st Century’, Scientific American, September 1991 (via reindexed)

Amazing foresight from 1991

Digital dualists believe that the digital world is “virtual” and the physical world “real.” …I am proposing an alternative view that states that our reality is both technological and organic, both digital and physical, all at once. We are not crossing in and out of separate digital and physical realities, ala The Matrix, but instead live in one reality, one that is augmented by atoms and bits. And our selves are not separated across these two spheres as some dualistic “first” and “second” self, but is instead an augmented self. A Haraway-like cyborg self comprised of a physical body as well as our digital Profile, acting in constant dialogue.
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